Exploring The Three Phases of Citizenship

Authored by Caroline Ott, Graduate Assistant- Fraternity and Sorority Life, Office of Student Leadership Development


With a presidential election looming in the week to come, the word citizenship takes on many different passionate meanings. What comes to your mind when you hear the word: citizenship?

Nelson Mandela once said, “We can change the world and make it a better place. It is in your hands to make a difference”. Citizenship can appear in your residence hall, your apartment, the classrooms you are in, or student organizations you are a part of. You can find it in your family, your friendships; citizenship can happen anywhere!

Citizenship can be broken down into three phases:

Coming Together

Any group of individuals that come together and form a group have completed the first phase of citizenship. Although we can all be good citizens individually, citizenship often comes in the form of a group and their collective leadership skills. A good citizen realizes that citizenship goes beyond the individual, or even the group, and is about the community.

Acting responsibly

In the second phase groups must share similar values and/or beliefs and a desire to make their community and the world a better place. This common purpose drives the individual or group to act responsibly in all of their actions, and in those actions to consider how all of those around them will be affected.

Interdependence

The final phase of citizenship is interdependence. Citizenship requires that individuals acknowledge the interdependence at work of all of those involved and affected by good citizenship, and how the web of positive actions connects us all.

Citizenship is the finale in the social change model. It is taking all of the aspects of creating a strong group and enacting those values to create positive change! We challenge all of you to display good citizenship in all of your community whether they be here at William & Mary or elsewhere!


This series also serves as a lead up to “Elevating Change Leadership Conference.” This is a conference for student leaders (and advisors) looking to learn more about effective leadership and cultivating impactful change for the causes and organizations they care most about. We hope you will join us for the conference on November 12th!  Please visit our website to learn more about the conference: http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/leadershipconference/index.php

Controversy with Civility

Authored by: Joe Wheeless, Assistant Director for Student Leadership Development, Office of Student Leadership Development


Dialogue. Conversation. Discourse. All of these are words that can be used to define Controversy with Civility. What is Controversy with Civility anyway?

To start, it’s a concept that’s part of the Social Change Model. Specifically, one of the 7 C’s needed to enact change in a group or society. But let’s break the concept down; how can three simple words bring so much depth to the Social Change Model.

Controversy is disagreement. It can be public and heated, but it doesn’t always have to be. We see this every day at all levels of society and it’s a natural part of life.

Civility is polite, reasonable, and respectful behavior. If you have ever watched C-SPAN while Congress in in session and seen speeches on the floor, you have witnessed some of the highest levels of civility. Addressing one another in the third person and through the “speaker” is a high form of politeness. Some have argued this is too much civility, but that’s another post for a different blog.

Now we turn to the middle word of this concept, with. I believe this is the most important of the three words. With means that people are things are together in one place. In other words, they BOTH exist together. Let that sink in…. it can be pretty powerful.

To say that disagreement and respectful behavior are existing in the same space is easy to see and understand, but that begs the question, why is it needed for change?

Differing opinions are good for groups and organizations because somewhere in the middle is the path of the organization. Disagreement, conversation, opinions, are all things that build the character of an organization; that make the organization who it is. If you’re trying to make change in a group, there are going to be members of that group who have differing ideas on how that change should happen. The conversation about the in between is where you get the direction you want to go it. So you have to have people in disagreement to move forward. It’s just the disagreement has to come with some respect for the opinions and the person.

There are many ways this concept shows up in daily life. Especially in this election season. But I’m going to keep this post out of the realm of politics.

Controversy with civility is needed and it going to happen in organizations. We are going to disagree and that’s okay. But if we can respect one another for having differing opinions, thoughts, and ideas, our organizations and groups are going to be better for it.

By committing yourself to have respectful disagreement in your organization you commit to having a stronger organization.


This series also serves as a lead up to “Elevating Change Leadership Conference.” This is a conference for student leaders (and advisors) looking to learn more about effective leadership and cultivating impactful change for the causes and organizations they care most about. We hope you will join us for the conference on November 12th!  Please visit our website to learn more about the conference: http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/leadershipconference/index.php

Goals, Values, & Vision: Navigating the Road to Common Purpose

Authored by: Brad Ward, Coordinator for Programming, Office of Student Leadership Development


“When you’re surrounded by people who share a passionate commitment around a common purpose, anything is possible.” –Howard Schultz

The “C” that I will focus on in the Social Change Model is one that really resonates with me as a Higher Education professional and a sports fan. No team has reached their full potential, whether it is winning a championship or championing student leaders, without sharing a common purpose.

Common purpose can be broken down into three factors that define how your team works together:

  • Goals– What is your team trying to achieve? Where would you like to be down the road? I think goals are extremely important to achieving a common purpose because they allow you to create the vehicle that is going to take you down the right path as a team. Now that you know what you are here to accomplish, what’s next?
  • Values– The values established amongst the team are important because they help to define how the goals will be achieved. Without common values across the board, you run the risk of not being efficient in achieving your goals! Values often help to define fit between potential team members and current team members. If you don’t share the same values as your team, then the overall process might fall behind. Let’s just say that common values are the well-oiled motor that helps your vehicle move forward.
  • Vision– Perhaps the most important of all is the vision. Vision is the motivating factor for your team because it ultimately gives everything you are doing its meaning. If your team has a great vision that everyone can rally behind, then you will find that your purpose becomes a lot clearer and your team members are more inspired. Vision is what ultimately fuels your vehicle to get you to where you need to go.

So all of this being said, I guess you can look at common purpose as a slightly altered version of a NASCAR race. Your team is comprised of the driver, pit crew, crew chief, and owner. No matter your position, all you will ever be doing is turning around in circles at a reckless speed if you don’t share a common purpose.

With that, I will leave you with a quote from the great Henry Ford, “Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.”


This series also serves as a lead up to “Elevating Change Leadership Conference.” This is a conference for student leaders (and advisors) looking to learn more about effective leadership and cultivating impactful change for the causes and organizations they care most about. We hope you will join us for the conference on November 12th!  Please visit our website to learn more about the conference: http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/leadershipconference/index.php

Depth Over Breadth Student Spotlight: Ben Zhang


Today’s Depth Over Breadth student spotlight is Ben Zhang.

Ben’s nominator shared,
“Humans is one of his few commitments at W&M, but he excels at it in an extraordinary way that I do not think it would be where it is today without his thoughtful guidance and leadership.”

When asked to reflect on Depth Over Breadth, Ben shared,

Honestly, I think so many people on this campus exemplify fine leadership in their lives without even realizing it. Leadership can be as simple as taking the initiative in a class discussion or settling a conflict between friends. In some ways, we are literally “leading” our lives, and just like any other type of leadership, leading ourselves well requires a serious sense of mission, as well as a keen artistry in creative maneuvers. A lot of how I lead comes from my reflections on my own experiences working with other people, so perhaps my leadership style is simply an extension of my life.

On behalf of the Office of Student Leadership Development, thank you, Ben for your leadership and commitment!

Ben Zhang HoWM_DepthOverBreadth

Ben Zhang wanted to share this picture along with the following students who are members of the Humans of William & Mary team: Sarah Garratt (’16), Anna Booman (’18), Siobhan Doherty (’19), Dani Aron-Schiavone (’17) Jack Zhang (’18), Brenna Cowardin (’19), Rahul Truter (’19), Allison Shomaker (’16)

 

Depth Over Breadth Student Spotlight: TJ Soroka

Today’s Depth Over Breadth Student Spotlight is TJ Soroka:

TJ’s nominator shared,

“As a student leader on campus, TJ proves that you can be a role model on campus without overbooking yourself.”

When asked to reflect on Depth Over Breadth, TJ shared,

“I think I would best describe my leadership style as the perfect mix of Henry Clay and Leslie Knope. I am hard-working and passionate, but at the same time I foster a fun-loving environment. I think this relates back to the Depth Over Breadth initiative because by focusing your efforts into only those things which you are passionate about, you create a positive and more enjoyable experience not only for yourself, but for the community around you.”

On behalf of the Student Leadership Development team, thank you TJ for your leadership and commitment!

TJ Soroka_DepthOverBreadth

More Than One: Reflections on Successful Collaboration

Authored by: Erin Fleming, Graduate Assistant for Campus Programming, Office of Student Leadership Development


Collaboration

We often hear the word “collaboration” thrown around during our organization meetings. There tends to be so many events on campus, we try to collaborate in order to support initiatives held by two or more organizations. The basic concept, collaborations involve more than one organization. But beyond that, what does a successful collaboration look like?

Collaborative efforts can bring bigger publicity, more staffing, increased funding, and sometimes, it creates a much larger event. Successful collaborative efforts can change the entire experience of an event, but how do we get here?

In my undergraduate and professional experiences, I have found three things to be true about successful collaborations. They require effective communication, a shared vision, and a plan of action.  

Effective Communication

It may seem obvious, but to begin a collaboration there needs to be a targeted collaborator(s). This is an organization(s) that is interested in supporting your initiative and event. This is also an organization that is available to communicate frequently and often as you all work together in implementation.

Shared Vision

As you are initially communicating with your collaborator(s), before the planning begins, it is important to establish a shared vision. All organizations involved in the process should come together to establish shared goals, expectations, and a purpose for the event. By the end of this meeting, all collaborators should have the same understanding of what the event or initiative will look like. You may need to have several of these meetings throughout the planning process to maintain this shared vision.

Plan of Action

Once a vision is established, tasks should be delegated amongst the organizations. I have found greatest success when delegations are written down, then copied for each organization to take home. This way there are no questions as to who needs to do what. It also limits the risk of a task going undone because everyone is aware of what needs to happen to make the event successful.

Collaborative events have been some of my favorites. Organizations have the ability to meet new peers, become more familiar with other organizations, and expand their network around campus. Some of my favorite memories come from collaborative efforts. I wish the same for you!


This series also serves as a lead up to “Elevating Change Leadership Conference.” This is a conference for student leaders (and advisors) looking to learn more about effective leadership and cultivating impactful change for the causes and organizations they care most about. We hope you will join us for the conference on November 12th!  Please visit our website to learn more about the conference: http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/leadershipconference/index.php

Depth Over Breadth Student Spotlight: Sarah Smith

Our first Depth Over Breadth student spotlight is Sarah Smith!

Sarah’s nominator shared,

“Sarah has more commitment to The Flat Hat than I have ever seen in someone toward anything. She encourages others to deeply commit…” 

When asked her thoughts about Depth Over Breadth in her leadership style, Sarah shared,While I do pursue other passions on campus, I have consciously prioritized my leadership in The Flat Hat and strive everyday to give more to the organization. I believe that in this instance, depth is more important than breadth, because I am focusing on something that matters to me and to the community.”

On behalf of the Office of Student Leadership Development, thank you Sarah for your leadership and commitment!

Depth Over Breadth Student Spotlight: Sarah Smith

Depth Over Breadth Student Spotlight: Sarah Smith


To learn more about Depth Over Breadth and The Office of Student Leadership Development, check out our website: http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/announcements/depthoverbreadth.php

Even When It’s Tough: A Reflection on Commitment

Authored by: Anne Strickland | Coordinator of Fraternity and Sorority Life, Office of Student Leadership Development


Commitment.

What do you think of when you here that word?

Unfortunately, in today’s activity based society the word commitment often inspires thoughts of repetition and stasis. Where everyone is looking for the next big thing, who values commitment anymore?

When I was a student, I was surrounded by people telling me to do more, be more and keep striving to do it all.  But, when I had the opportunity my senior year to join an organization and focus on the work I was doing there, things really started to take off. I was truly enjoying my involvement and leadership and felt like my commitment to the organization helped me grow exponentially as a leader. This commitment was not just doing the job I was asked, it was volunteering for the other officer’s events, helping out in the office to fold programs, and helping further the ideals that the organization supported.

True commitment is not stasis. Commitment is actively deciding to focus your energy on a few things that matter to you and giving them your all. True commitment is the ability to stick with something even when it’s tough, and to keep coming back because lasting change does not happen overnight.

There is a reason Commitment is one of the Cs of the social change model. It is a value that one must make if one wants to become a successful leader.

To quote from Abraham Lincoln, “Commitment is what transforms a promise into a reality”. So the next time you look at your obligations, think about making an active commitment to them, and you will grow as a leader exponentially.


This series also serves as a lead up to “Elevating Change Leadership Conference.” This is a conference for student leaders (and advisors) looking to learn more about effective leadership and cultivating impactful change for the causes and organizations they care most about. We hope you will join us for the conference on November 12th!  Please visit our website to learn more about the conference: http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/leadershipconference/index.php

A Reflection On Congruence: Head-to-Heart

Authored by: Jaymi Thomas | Graduate Assistant, Office of Student Leadership Development, Student Leadership Programs


E.E. Cummings wrote “To be nobody-but-yourself in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody but yourself–means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight– and never stop fighting.” This quote made me think about the second C in the Social Change Model: congruence. Congruence is one of my favorite aspects of the Social Change Model. It’s all about connecting what you’re thinking and feeling,embracing authenticity and honesty toward others.

As someone who will admit to experiencing all the feels, quite often, I am always up for conversations and learning more about emotional intelligence. Congruence and aligning one’s values, beliefs, and strengths are essential parts of my leadership journey. Some of the ways that I attempt to practice congruence are reflecting and talking to mentors to learn more about the ways they mindfully practice authenticity.

Congruence is recognizing that your inner and outer self can be more similar than they are different. As I grow in the student affairs profession and work to identify the leadership qualities I want to embrace, one goal I have is to practice congruence and lead in an authentic way- in other words, to align my head, heart, hands, and feet.


This series also serves as a lead up to “Elevating Change: William & Mary Celebrates 20 Years of the Social Change Model.”  This event is a conference for student leaders who are interested in learning how to be more effective leaders and how to cultivate impactful change for the organizations and causes they care most about.  We hope you will join us for the conference on November 12th!  Please visit our website to learn more about the conference: http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/leadershipconference/index.php

Elevating Change Series: An Introduction to the Social Change Model

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Authored by: Jennifer Leung Associate Director of the Office of Student Leadership Development


As a young professional in grad school, I was first introduced to the Social Change Model as a foundation for how I do my work as a leadership educator and it has remained a constant throughout my professional journey.  I’m sure when you hear “models” and “foundations” when talking about leadership, it makes the leadership seem kind of abstract, but it’s really not.  In my opinion, it’s the Social Change Model that really makes leadership simple and approachable.  At its core, the Social Change Model is this:  Learn more about yourself, learn how to work with others and in community, and by leveraging that knowledge and partnerships, you can create positive change for the organizations and causes you care most about.

You may be wondering, what it is about this model that makes it so approachable…..there are several “key assumptions” about leadership that help shape the Social Change Model:

  • Leadership is collaborative
  • Leadership is a group process, not the authority of an individual
  • Leadership is based on values
  • Leadership can be practiced by anyone, it’s not reserved for the select few with titles or positions
  • Leadership is about change

The Social Change Model of Leadership Development was developed in 1996 by a group of leadership specialists with undergraduate students in mind.  In honor of the 20th anniversary of the Social Change Model, members of the Student Leadership Development staff will be posting about the various components of the model: Consciousness of Self, Congruence, Commitment, Collaboration, Common Purpose, Controversy with Civility, Citizenship, and Change.

This series also serves as a lead up to “Elevating Change: William & Mary Celebrates 20 Years of the Social Change Model.”  This event is a conference for student leaders who are interested in learning how to be more effective leaders and how to cultivate impactful change for the organizations and causes they care most about.  We hope you will join us for the conference on November 12th!  Please visit our website to learn more about the conference: http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/leadershipconference/index.php